2017 Theology Weekend, March 11-12

Claudia May, Ph.D.,

Scholar and Practitioner, Theology and Reconciliation

WHAT’S GOING ON?”

Saturday, March 11

10:00 – 3:00
Through this question, we sought to develop a clearer and deeper understanding of the specific challenges participants face through seeing, naming, and standing in the brokenness. Christian reconciliation is a process to look at real-world situations of pain and conflict to discover ways to bring on healing and wholeness.

Theology is simply talk about God and God’s relation to the world. To quote the lyrics from Marvin Gaye’s song: “Oh, you know we’ve got to find a way…To bring some understanding here today.” This theology talk leads us to look at Jesus’ life for guidance to achieve that understanding. You leave feeling loved and hope-filled. (lecture with lunch break).

About our Speaker

Claudia May, Ph.D.

Dr. May is an associate professor of Reconciliation Studies at Bethel University, St. Paul, Minnesota. May also lectures at Duke Divinity School Institute for Reconciliation. She is a specialist in reconciliationstudies and African American, Black British, and Caribbean literature and popular culture, as well as Biblical Studies, multiethnic and culture expressions of faith, and Christian Hip Hop. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, and a Master in Theological Studies from the Pacific School of Religion (Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley California). She has over 12 years’ experience teaching in higher education. Her work has been published by Oxford University Press, Taylor & Francis, Walter de Gruyter, Lexington Books, and Routledge. She is a passionate follower of Jesus, a woman of prayer, and a lover of biblical stories and wisdom.

Sunday, March 12 |  9:30am to 10:30am | Chapel
Dr. May speaks at the NU Class gathering; all are invited to attend.

View speaker bio
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Visit speaker’s website

 

2016 Theology Weekend Jan 15-17

  The Rev. Dr. Daniel M. Bell, Jr., Professor of Theology and Ethics
“Jesus, the Justice of God, and the Mission of the Church”
January 15-17, 2016

Friday, January 15, 2016

7:00 – 9:00 pm  Movie: “The Mission” starring Robert DeNiro and Jeremy Irons. Our speaker, The Rev. Dr. Daniel M. Bell, Jr., recommends this movie “because it offers a powerful and provocative account of the mercy of God and the mission of the Church, with, surprisingly, some strong Methodist/Wesleyan themes. During at least one of the sessions, we will discuss the movie and use it as a foil for our conversation.”

Saturday, January 16, 2016

9:30 – 4:30 am “Jesus, the Justice of God, and the Mission of the Church” Lecture with lunch break

Sunday, January 17, 2016

Dr. Bell preached on the topic of “Revealing the Glory of God” from the scripture text of John 2:1-11 at all three worship services: 8:30 and 11:00 am in the Sanctuary, and 9:30 am in the Contemporary Worship Center.


About our Speaker

The Rev. Dr. Daniel M. Bell, Jr.

Dr. Bell is Professor of Theology and Ethics at Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary in Columbia, SC. He is an ordained Elder in The United Methodist Church. A graduate of Stetson University in Florida, he earned the Master of Divinity degree from Duke Divinity School and a PhD (in theology and ethics) from Duke University where he worked with Dr. Stanley Hauerwas. He has authored several books, including Liberation Theology After the End of History (Routledge, 2001), Just War as Christian Discipleship (Brazos, 2009), and The Economy of Desire: Christianity and Capitalism in a Postmodern World (Baker Academic, 2012).

Dr. Bell is a popular speaker at colleges and universities, campus ministries, and churches on topics such as war and peace, the moral life, stewardship, and mission of the church today. He has presented papers before distinguished organizations such as the Latin American Studies Association International Congress, the American Academy of Religion, the Society of Christian Ethics, and the Irish School of Ecumenics. His work has appeared in various journals including Christianity Today, The Christian Century, Modern Theology, Journal for Peace and Justice Studies, Communio, Cross-Currents, and Studies in Christians Ethics.

2015 Theology Weekend, Feb 14 and 15

Dr. John B. Cobb, Jr., Professor of Theology Emeritus at the Claremont School of Theology, Claremont California.

Saturday, February 14, 2015 (9:30 – 4:30 Lectures with lunch break)

Lecture 1 – Learning from the Bible: A survey of Hebrew thinking of God, Jesus’ unique understanding, and Paul’s development.
Lecture 2 – Learning from Experience: An examination of our ordinary experience to see where we find Jesus’ Abba
Lecture 3 – Learning from Science: Why science excludes not only a “God of the gaps” but also the Abba of Jesus, and why it should not do so.

Sunday, February 15, 2015

Learning from World Religions: A survey of world religions shows that some have no need of God to achieve their goals. An explanation of how theistic and non-theistic experience and belief can be complimentary. Worship Service: 11:00 – 12:00 noon Sanctuary

About our Speaker

Dr. John B. Cobb, Jr. is Professor of Theology Emeritus at the Claremont School of Theology, Claremont California. He was educated at the Canadian Academy, Kobe, Japan; Newnan High School, Georgia; Emory-at-Oxford; University of Michigan; University of Chicago.

An American theologian, philosopher, and environmentalist, Cobb is often regarded as the preeminent scholar in the field of process philosophy and process theology – the school of thought associated with the philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead. Cobb is the author of more than fifty books. In 2014, Cobb was elected to the prestigious American Academy of Arts and Sciences. 

A unifying theme of Cobb’s work is his emphasis on ecological interdependence – the idea that every part of the ecosystem is reliant on all the other parts. Cobb has argued that humanity’s most urgent task is to preserve the world on which it lives and depends, an idea which his primary influence – philosopher and mathematician Alfred North Whitehead – describes as “world-loyalty.” 

Cobb is well known for his trans disciplinary approach, integrating insights from many different areas of study and bringing different specialized disciplines into fruitful communication. Because of his broad-minded interest and approach, Cobb has been influential in a wide range of disciplines, including theology, ecology, economics, biology and social ethics.

In 1971, he wrote the first single-author book in environmental ethics – Is It Too Late? A Theology of Ecology—which argued for the relevance of religious thought in approaching the ecological crisis. In 1989, he co-authored the book For the Common Good: Redirecting the Economy Toward Community, Environment, and a Sustainable Future, which critiqued current global economic practice and advocated for a sustainable, ecology-based economics. He has written extensively on religious pluralism and interfaith dialogue, particularly between Buddhism and Christianity, as well as the need to reconcile religion and science.

Audio files are available as follows:

2/14/15      Session 1; Learning from the Bible: A survey of Hebrew thinking of God, Jesus’ unique understanding, and Paul’s development.
2/14/15      Session 2; Learning from Experience: An examination of our ordinary experience to see where we find Jesus’ Abba.
2/14/15      Session 3; Learning from Science: Why science excludes not only a “God of the gaps” but also the Abba of Jesus, and why it should not do so.
2/15/15      Sunday School Lesson; Learning from World Religions: A survey of world religions shows that some have no need of God to achieve their goals. An explanation of how theistic and non-theistic experience and belief can be complimentary.

If you want copies of any of these recordings, send your request by email to nuclass@nuclass.org indicating which ones you desire and they will be sent to you as an attachment to an e-mail. 

 

2014 Theology Weekend, March 1 and 2

Dr. Ted A. Smith, Associate Professor of Preaching and Ethics

The Candler School of Theology, Emory University

“Religion and Violence”

Dr Ted A. Smith

Dr. Smith is the author of The New Measures:  A Theological History of Democratic Practice (2007).  He works at the intersections of practical and political theology; with special attention to the forms preaching and worship take in modern societies.  Smith’s current research explores the notion of “divine violence” through a study of sermons, speeches, and essays about the abolitionist John Brown.

Ted earned his bachelor’s degree from Duke University, a Master of Arts from Oxford University, a Master of Divinity from Princeton Theological Seminary, and a Ph.D. from Emory University.

An ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church (USA), he was earlier the pastor of Presbyterian churches of Dundee and Weston, NY.

He is also the author of “The New Measures: A Theological History of Democratic Practice,”  “Divine Violence: John Brown and the Limits of Ethics,” and “A Preacher’s History of Preaching,” with Dr. Tom Long, forthcoming.

2013 Theology Weekend, Feb 2 and 3

Speaker: Theologian Rev. Dr. James L Waits

Subject: The Changing Church and How Theological Institutions and Clergy Training Must Evolve.

Focus points will address:

  • How should seminaries prepare clergy to minister in the (evolving/emerging) church of the future?
  • Does the message also need to evolve, or will it stay the same?

Rev. Dr. James L Waits (Methodist) is well qualified to speak on these topics, and brings a profoundly ecumenical perspective, because of his years with the seminary accreditation agency. He is the former dean of Candler Theological Seminary on the campus of Emory University in Atlanta, where he served for 8 years (1978–1991). He also is the retired Executive Director of the Association of Theological Schools.